In The Folds meets Peppermint Magazine: the review of Wide Leg Pants and Ruffle Sleeve top patterns

I would like to start by saying that these two patterns are free. We all love free stuff, but when someone puts so much good work into it I am really grateful they are free and considering that they are both so well drafted. They are In the Folds patterns after all.

The patterns are available through the Peppermint Magazine. I knew they were free but always assumed you needed some subscription to the magazine to get the patterns for free. But no people, they are free for you to go over there and get them! Wowzers!

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So lets start with the pants. I have a feeling you want to read about them first.

They are high waisted wide-leg pants that are so in fashion right now. They have a zip fly, big front pockets and you can make them in all sorts of hem lengths. I made mine in brown 100% linen fabric from a local store bought recently. This maybe was one of the fastest transitions from 2D fabric to 3D garment in my sewing room – only about a week!

Based on the finished garment measurements I cut size B in the waist and sized up to C in hips and the fit is great.

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Me: Gala, camera is the other way; Gala: why are we standing here?

 

The pattern instructions did have mistakes and were confusing in some parts, but overall are clear and easy to follow. Some pattern pieces are connected wrong to the instructions. For example, when you have to insert the zip fly cover it uses the name of that pattern piece but the number in the bracket that points you to the pattern piece is of the zip fly which is a different pattern piece. I have to mention at this point that this was my first time sewing any sort of fly and yes, it was confusing, but reading it over few times and with help of the pictures within instructions (which are correct) I figured it out and made perfectly good looking fly. If you have a fly under your belt from any project before you should have no problem. Just give yourself the time to go through the instructions before sewing these steps. And remember you got the pattern for free.

The pattern has no mistakes and is drafted beautifully. The fit is great! I made the pattern as is without any modifications and chose my size based on the finished garment measurements.

 

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no Gala, we are pretending to walk this way!

 

These are the second pair of pants I ever made. First pair were the Megan Nielsen Flint pants which have a looser crotch fit, so I was worried these might need some more work. But they fit perfectly. Now I am on my third pants pattern and it is the Lander pants from True Bias. Just for reference for those who made the later, I will need to make adjustments there because the crotch curve is killing me (yeah, not comfortable and sitting is out of the question). So you can sort of imagine the crotch situation relation between the patterns. The crotch curve on the Wide-Leg Pants is bigger by about 1 centimetre on the front leg piece and by about 2 centimetres on the back leg piece for my size. So that makes a total of 3 centimetres which may not sound much but we all know what a difference that makes.

 

Front pockets are roomy and big enough to hold you phone and more. Perfect! They are not the comfiest to hold your arms in but I think that was not the idea behind the design anyway so I can not blame that on the pattern.

 

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The zip fly came easily together. I already mentioned the problematic instructions, but it is an easy straightforward process with many steps. If you follow them and make one by one you end up with a zip fly that works as it is supposed to. And boy am I proud of that one!

 

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The pants come with a curved waistband. I always wanted to try that but so far all patterns I used had straight waistbands. The curved one sits so much better with no gaping in the back or anywhere else. Maybe the straight waistband would also be fine as the pants are high waisted and they sit on my waist, but I like this better. I am happy I now have a curved waistband I can use on other pant patterns in the future and not having to draft my own. It is not hard, but it is so much easier when you do not have to. One thing to note is that there is mention of fusing the waistband at the beginning as part of the suggested cutting plans, but no mention of it in the later sewing steps. For me that means it is easy to skip it as I rarely go through cutting plans and I only later saw it was mentioned there. I did not put and interfacing in. I thought about adding it on my own and can not really say anything in my defence about why I did not, but hopefully it will not stretch out (considering it is not straight but curved). I wore it several times already in the first week of making it and it is fine. But for the next pair I would add it just to be on the safe side. Plus you definitely add to the longevity of the pants that way so I would recommend it (even to my old self).

 

There are no back pockets on the pattern and I like it that way. It would be easy to add them but I prefer the clean look without them.

 

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look at her playing along with me! 🙂

 

 

I did not play with the hem length and made it as per pattern. I think it goes great with sandals and is that ‘long-but-not-long’ length while still escaping far enough from the ‘do you have a flood at home’ length. I think shorts would look great as well so I might go and make myself a pair.

 

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Now lets talk about the Ruffle Sleeve Top. The pattern is so lovely and I have not came across any mistakes within instructions for this one. Also, the pattern comes with instructions for french seams! I love that! That is also one of the things I always wanted to try but never did (I should get better at doing things I want with my sewing). So, when it was part of instructions I thought it was the perfect opportunity to try it out. I love it and I can now say I will definitely use that method for any garments with flowy light fabrics that require that kind of treatment. There are even instructions to french seaming the armholes!

 

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I used a cotton fabric for this one so that kind of finish maybe is not the best as it did bulk a bit in places, but not too much. I am still happy I french seamed it all instead of zig zaging my brains out. Well, I guess I was tired by the end and forgot to french seam between the arm and ruffle, but maybe better because of the bulk issue. All hems were turned two times by about 1 cm and sewed with straight stitch.

The fit is great in the shoulders and bust area and then it flares out which is the best for a summer outfit. The only alteration I made was making the bust darts longer by about 8 centimetres (!) because originally they (sadly) did not even reach my bust. But that is the easiest alteration there is and with it the fit is great.

 

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I can really recommend both of these patterns and I would happily use both of them again. I keep imagining all the colourful fabrics I can use for them. All the plain colourful pants of the rainbow and print crazy tops in the flowiest of fabrics – the dream!

 

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I’m telling you, this dog doesn’t get it

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Thank you for reading!

Ana

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